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Yellow Cherry Guava

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M Updated March 18, 2019
 
5.0
 
4.8 (1)
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Yellow Cherry Guava

Type of Fruit Tree

Plant Info

Botanical Family Name (if known)
Psidium Littorale Var. Littorale
Other Common Names
Small Lemon Guava
Propagation
  • Cutting
  • Grown from seed
Size
1 to 3 metres high

Basic Growing Tips

Growing Tips
  • Grows in most soil conditions
  • Best grown in warmer conditions
  • Grows best in full sun
  • Frost Sensitive
Planting Instructions
The cherry guava is a very hardy shrub (once established) and it will usually thrive with moderate water and a little fertiliser once a year. Plants are often purchased in small pots and should be planted out as per most fruit trees by digging a hole at least twice the size of the root ball, and adding some fertiliser and/or compost before mulching around the base. Water the plant in and give it regular water over several weeks until it is established.

If growing from seed they should be soaked in water for at least 48 hours to soften the outer casing before sowing in punnets. Plant out when the seedling is strong enough and has developed a good root system.
Harvesting
The fruit develops after flowering and can take a few months before the small cherry to golf ball sized fruits are ripe to harvest.

It's best to let the guava fruit ripen on the plant and once it turns from green to yellow it should easily come away from the stem. Once the fruit ripens it will deteriorate pretty quickly so ensure the fruit is harvested in a timely manner otherwise it will fall to the ground and spoil.

Generally, the fruit doesn't all ripen at once, which is a good thing for a backyard fruit tree to prevent a glut of produce.

Summary

The Yellow Cherry Guava is a hardy, low maintenance, fruiting shrub/tree that produces small fruit for eating fresh or preserving and can also be used as a hedging plant due to its growth habit and size. 

Growth is usually at a modest rate (but this can vary depending on climate and soil conditions) so expect the shrub to be around waist high after 1 - 2 seasons.

The fruit is sweet and juicy with small edible seeds and is best eaten fresh straight off the plant when ripe.   

 

Editor review

1 reviews

Very versatile fruiting tree/shrub
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Easy to Grow? 
 
5.0
Taste 
 
5.0
Disease & Pest Resistance 
 
5.0
Productivity 
 
5.0
This Yellow Cherry Guava is one of my favourite fruiting plants because it produces tasty sweet fruit and is very easy to maintain.

We have ours growing out the front yard along the fence line to act as an ornamental edible, plus the fence gives the plant some support as they can be a little sprawly in the first few years until it develops a strong framework.

I have been quite surprised at just how drought tolerant this variety is once established and generally it requires very little care. 

It's pretty slow growing during the first few years and then growth picks up. Initially, we started with one plant to give it a go and then was so impressed got a further 4 more to plant alongside. 

In our area we unfortunately have a native pest called the QLD fruit fly, which attacks fruit, but because the fruit from our cherry guavas ripen in autumn after the main fruit fly season is over this shrub does not require exclusion netting and the fruit never gets stung. 

I do recommend this fruit tree/shrub for small or large gardens alike - you won't be sorry!     

Plant Knowledge Base

I grow/have grown this plant

Where is this plant growing?

In Ground/Raised Bed

What is your Climate?

Sub-Tropical

Organically Grown?

Yes

Fertilisers, Organics, or Other Supplements Used

Compost and chicken manure enriched soil

Favourite way to prepare/eat

I like them straight off the plant when fully ripe. Also, if you get a big enough harvest they can be juiced.

Pros & Cons

Pros
Great tasting fruit
Fruit ripens in autumn when fruit fly is less active so the shrub doesn't require netting.
Good fruit production
Can be used as an edible hedge
Ornamental
Cons
Pretty slow growing - initially.

Would You Grow this Plant Again?

Yes

If you purchased plant online - where?

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User reviews

1 reviews

Overall rating 
 
4.8
Easy to Grow? 
 
4.0  (1)
Taste 
 
5.0  (1)
Disease & Pest Resistance 
 
5.0  (1)
Productivity 
 
5.0  (1)
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Ratings
Easy to Grow?
Is it a vigorous grower in most soils?
Taste
Rate how good the produce tastes
Disease & Pest Resistance
Is it a target for pest and diseases?
Productivity
Does this plant produce well?
Plant Knowledge Base
Where is this plant growing?
What is your Climate?
Organically Grown?
Fertilisers, Organics, or Other Supplements Used
Favourite way to prepare/eat
Pros & Cons
Would You Grow this Plant Again?
If you purchased plant online - where?
Comments
Adore it
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Easy to Grow? 
 
4.0
Taste 
 
5.0
Disease & Pest Resistance 
 
5.0
Productivity 
 
5.0
Bought this April 2017, and am getting stuck into the first ripe fruits March 2019. They are stunningly delicious, quite possibly the best fruit I've ever eaten. For the best feed, let them fall off the bush. I just check around the pot every morning and evening, and scoff down what I find. Can't say how long they last once ripe, as I eat them!

I bought mine labelled as the strawberry version of the cherry guava, but it's actually the gold. Can't say I'm disappointed because the fruit really is the best thing I've ever eaten. There's almost no tartness to them, sweet- but only just enough to make them tasty, just juicy and incredibly flavourful, like the loveliest tropical juice you've ever sipped at. No insipid aftertaste or gummy feel. It's hard to describe the lovely smell and taste- a little citrus, a little pineapple, maybe. One simply thinks 'fruity' at the smell! The seeds are few and not hard at all, and I've never spat them out- they're completely unnoticeable when eating. Small fruit- only about 4cm across, tops, but no loss through peeling or seeds, as you eat the whole thing, and still satisfying to eat one. I really can say, they've replaced mulberries as my favourite fruit. I will be buying several more of these, now.

I've been told to always split them open to check for maggots, but they apparently only ripen when cooler weather sets in, and we've had an early patch of cool, so they have done so, but usually fruit fly is not an issue when weather cools, here. I'd net them after cooling if you're expecting more warm or if fruit fly persists in autumn, but I don't think that's going to give me any problems. 

The plant starts out a little fussy. I potted it up in my standard fruit tree mix, compost and coir (soaked in seaweed, liquid fish emulsion, a touch of liquid gypsum, worm tea, and molasses), blood and bone, and some potash, and I think this one got a tiny handful of organic dynamic lifter pellets. Mulched with sugar cane mulch, and let be. I found it did not grow at all for the first year, and developed a red rusty looking blotch to the leaves that never matched up to any research I did on pests, diseases, and deficiencies. Was a bit befuddled, but I believe in systems that take care of themselves, so I didn't bother with any control methods. Instead, I gave it a bigger pot and a friend -a geranium; the friend helps hold water in the larger pot until the tree roots spread- for better access to water in our hot, dry, muggy, confounding subtropical heat, and just gave it occasional liquid seasol and left it alone.

Just as I was considering turfing it -as my plot is limited, and I need productive plants that thrive- it suddenly, this last spring, just took off. Tripled in size (to about 50+cm tall, now, but quite wide and bushy, from it's spindly little three branch 15cm), put on so much bushy, glossy green growth, and then put on flowers, and every single flower set fruit. The native (tiny stingless and blue banded) and european bees loved them, and the hover flies never stopped coming! They have a long ripening time, and it's only just now in the start of March 2019 that they are ripening, almost eight months since flowering, very comparable to citrus. Completely worth the wait, though, as they are amazeballs. Have I mentioned that the fruit is stunning? I was especially pleased with the fruit as I have a very strict watering policy in my yard, with winter watering being only what comes into the waste buckets in the kitchen sink and the shower, and spring/summer watering being getting the hose out only every second/third day. We have EXCEPTIONALLY limited rain water where I live. Most storms and showers miss us completely- I find rain tanks and buckets basically useless here. Despite this restriction, the fruit is still beautifully juicy.  

I plant to give it a good top dressing of rotted sheep manure and compost after it's done its fruiting, but keep with the standard of occasional seaweed, fish, worm tea and maybe some gypsum, with a top dressing of blood and bone twice a year, and a yearly application of lime/dolomite. I'm considering building cages for them as well- they can be exceptionally weedy in a very bad way in our Brisbane bushland, and while the kookaburras and magpies drive off all the other fruit eating birds here, and fruit bats don't seem to bother us, possums can be a bit of a nightmare. So far they've just stuck to stripping my poor lemons and limes bare, but I'd resent sharing the fruits of my beautiful guavas, especially if I was harming my local bushland as well. Consider nets, my friends!

Very impressed with this one for Brisbane. I'll be sacrificing quite a few pots and prime growing spots for more of these!

Plant Knowledge Base

I grow/have grown this plant

Where is this plant growing?

In Container

What is your Climate?

Organically Grown?

Yes

Fertilisers, Organics, or Other Supplements Used

Seaweed, Liquid Fish, Molasses

Pros & Cons

Pros
Amazing fruit
Early producer- we only had to wait a year and a half
Pest resistant
Low care- plant, mulch, and (almost)forget
REALLY amazing fruit
Ripens a few fruit at a time, despite the flowers setting fruit all at once
Not a terribly greedy feeder- a bit of liquid nosh every once in a while, and a yearly top dressing of whatever compost on hand and its happy
Pretty drought tolerant- fruit still sets and holds with restricted watering
Is a host plant for lacewing eggs in my yard
Fruit holds well even through storms and high winds
REALLY AMAZING FRUIT
Cons
Can be weedy in Australia- net tree if bats, possums, or fruit eating birds are an issue in your area
Slow starter- takes a good year or so to take off
Can be a target for pests and disease the first year while it settles in- keep up the seaweed emulsion and regular water for it to settle in and look after itself.
Long ripening time

Would You Grow this Plant Again?

Yes

If you purchased plant online - where?

Owner's reply

Thank you!

AM
Top 10 Reviewer 1 reviews
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